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Natural Awakenings Richmond

From the Publisher

Mar 01, 2020 08:42AM

Jessica Coffey, Publisher

Dear Reader,

And just like that, we are headed into spring. It was such a mild winter—I had daffodils blooming in February!—that I am not wishing for warmer temps like I normally do, but I am looking forward to planning and planting my garden. Last year, the greens did really well so I will focus on those first. I am excited that our feature article is about plant-based eating as we move into the months where we can grow our own and soon find local farmers’ markets bursting at the seams with fresh fruit and veggies. As Dr. Michael Greger, author of How Not to Die, says, “We should all be eating fruits and vegetables as if our lives depend on it—because they do.”

This is also a good time to think about the metaphorical seeds we plant. Along with the seeds we plant in our gardens, we can plant intentions and grow some beautiful things in our lives. And as we watch the seedlings burst through the soil and become bountiful plants, we can observe how our intentions grow and thrive. Recently, I learned from several wise souls that everything really comes down to fear or love—are we driven by the heart or the ego? My desire is to choose love as often as I can. And those are the seeds I intend to plant this spring—of love, kindness and generosity. Because, as Cindy Ricardo states in her inspirational article, “The Generous Heart”.

“Living from the ego is painful and exhausting. It’s like feeding a hungry monster that’s never satisfied. Ego craves, pursues and clings to status, approval, material wealth and control. It views the world through the eyes of fear—constantly evaluating, judging and acting in ways that are self-centered, defensive and protective. Ego closes our heart and makes us small, fearful and contracted.

By contrast, generosity requires that we open our hearts to the world and each other. We allow ourselves to be vulnerable. In doing this, we open ourselves fully to life, love, and relationships. We let go of striving and pursuing things. When we stop striving, we begin to see, value and respond to what’s happening in the present moment in ways that are healthy and healing. Our priority shifts from acquiring things to appreciating what we have and being open to sharing with others.

Generosity is a quality of kindness, of living from a place of abundance. We see the world through a clear lens that isn’t clouded by fear, wanting or clinging. When we interact with others, our connection is genuine. We see people instead of judgments or labels… Generosity awakens goodness in the heart, and this helps us open to life, love and relationships.”

May generosity grow in your life this spring. Happy Reading!

Jessica